Great short piece on games by PBS:

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The video below is a discussion from GSW with Jenova Chen of Thatgamecompany, discussing the past games, Flower and Fl0w, and the upcoming, Journey.

Two factors that I found particularly interesting from the video was that in each game produced, they focus on integrating just one emotional focus, to keep things simple. However, throughout the process other emotions are integrated to aid with the narrative. I really like the idea of creating with a focus of just one aspect. I’ve created board games with themes in mind, but never explored emotions. That might be an interesting challenge to take on in the future.

The other factor was that they started playtesting with their prototypes on week one. That’s awesome. So many times it seems like design gets overshadowed with the designer’s ideas and the actual player experience is left until later in the process. Playtesting can change the design aspects and focus so much, it’s great to see it being incorporated so early in the development process.

Jenova Chen’s Journey – E3 2010 from Jeriaska on Vimeo.

This Google video shows an interesting approach to adding information to computational databases that can only be entered efficiently through human means. Luis von Ahn gives the talk at Google:

It takes knowledge storing to a different level. A simpler one than originally thought.

While looking at some of the TED Talks, I ran across one by Brenda Laurel who did research on girls and gaming in the 1990s.

Brenda Laurel on Making Games for Girls

I find it interesting how they went about their research, to record girls just talking and taking pictures of things that are important to them. Another interesting aspect to point out is in the game, Rocket, the main character, makes her decisions via emotions rather than strategic data. An interesting game mechanic choice. I had never heard of the game when I was going through school, and find it interesting as I was in the right age group at the time. I would be interested to find a copy now that I’m older to see what resulted from the research performed.

While looking at some of the TED Talks, I ran across one by Brenda Laurel who did research on girls and gaming in the 1990s.

Brenda Laurel on Making Games for Girls

I find it interesting how they went about their research, to record girls just talking and taking pictures of things that are important to them. Another interesting aspect to point out is in the game, Rocket, the main character, makes her decisions via emotions rather than strategic data. An interesting game mechanic choice. I had never heard of the game when I was going through school, and find it interesting as I was in the right age group at the time. I would be interested to find a copy now that I’m older to see what resulted from the research performed.